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Reflections on June 8th, 2012:

Moving into the rest of our life………… Over the last several years Alice and I have been “wintering” with our motor-home at a campground i...

Saturday, September 23, 2017

End of September, and our local theater season has started...

Summer is over, but the only changes that are noticeable are a few more out of state licence plates as the early snow-birds start their annual flock.  What IS noticeable is that our local theater season has begun.  Last week it was "Dogfight" at the Henegar, and this weekend it's The Adams Family Musical on Saturday (Titusville Playhouse) and Beauty and the Beast at Cocoa Village.

We have several very good community theaters in our Titusville area and feel very blessed.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Motorhome is GOOD....whew!!! :)

We just got back from Christmas a few hours ago.  The access road to the storage area was clear, and the actual storage was dry with NO issues.  Even the small boats and trailers that had covers were just fine....you'd never knew the wind blew ).

In the meantime, David came over and did some serious trimming on the palms and others plants that took a hit, with Joanna helping.  Things are looking up!

The after-storm loss of adrenaline..

Yesterday was a "lay back and glad we got through" kind of day.  We could do that because we weren't hit that hard....were very fortunate in fact.  About 80% of Titusville is still without power (including our son David & his Ashley and the restaurant he works at, Shilo's).  Since he's off today and younger than us he volunteered to come over later and do some yard clean up.  There are a lot of palm tree
issues and we might lose one totally....lost a hibiscus also, and our large cactus.  These can be replanted and over the long run are not an issue.

More concerning is our motorhome which we store in Christmas Florida off Route 50.  We went out to check it yesterday and the entrance road to the storage area was totally submerged and not passable. We'll go out later this morning and see if anything has changed.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Still blowing...the nasty girl won't quite go away...Photo's








Power on at 0700....

Unbelievably nasty night!  The power just came on.  We took some minor damage to a few soffits, lost my best outside cactus and some major palm fronds but all in all we're looking good.  That being said, just as I'm typing this on the kitchen Samsung Chromebook Plus we had a light flicker...still blowing out there but not nearly as bad as the all-nighter howling.  Will post more after my coffee.

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Lost power

Assume we're OK ...power is out and we're going to bed and read (yea Kindle!!)😄

News update from Florida Today

Brought to you by USATODAY.com
Hurricane Irma delivered a massive wallop on the Florida Keys and the state's southwest coastline on Sunday, causing untold damage and leaving millions of Floridians without power. This newsletter will be sent out daily to provide up-to-date information about the storm into your mailbox. You are receiving it because you're a subscriber to the Top 5 news list from your local news provider, or because you signed up. If you have friends, family or neighbors who would benefit from this information, please share the sign-up page with them.
Additionally, USA TODAY NETWORK newspapers in Florida: The (Fort Myers) News-PressNaples Daily NewsFlorida Today,Treasure Coast NewspapersTallahassee Democrat andPensacola News Journal have suspended their paywalls to provide important public-safety information.
A car sits abandoned in storm surge along North Fort Lauderdale Beach Boulevard on Sept. 10, 2017 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Irma first made landfall as a Category 4 in the Sunshine State at Cudjoe Key, packing maximum sustained winds of 130 mph early Sunday morning. The storm made a second landfall near Naples as a Category 3 with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph.
As expected, the Atlantic Coast avoided a direct hit after the storm took a westward shift as it approached Florida. The size of the storm was still able to douse east coast of the Peninsula from afar, filling Miami's streets with water and knocking out power to millions.
Neighbors in Tampa, St. Petersburg and in the Florida Panhandle watched the destruction unfold as they too prepped for Irma's wrath. The northern part of the Gulf Coast will get its taste of Irma over the next 19 hours.
At 5 p.m., Irma had weakened to a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph. In the early evening Sunday it was a few miles north of Naples. It will continue a northern trek up Florida's Gulf coast and should pass near Tampa tonight or Mondaymorning. The National Hurricane Center said the storm will speed up and should be in North Florida, near the Georgia border, by about 2 p.m. Monday.
The Keys
Officials worry what will become of the low-lying Florida Keys. Walls of rain were seen on Duval Street and inches of water flowed down iconic Key West streets. The editor of the local newspaper said, "Everything is under water, I mean everything."
Powerless
More than five million Floridians were without power as of Sundayafternoon, even before the storm reached the Tampa area, which has about 3 million people. About 17,000 utility workers from 30 states stand ready to help restore power. Florida Power and Light had already restored power to 400,000 customers.
Trump: 'This is some big monster'
President Trump applauded the work of state and federal officials, saying "The bad news is that this is some big monster, but I think we're very well coordinated," he said from the White House.
Acting deputy FEMA administrator Kathleen Fox said 13,000 people from an array of federal agencies are positioned in or near the state.
Storm surge
Meteorologists say storm surges — water rising onto land — could be between 10 and 15 feet in Naples and from 5 to 8 feet near Tampa and St. Petersburg. Storm surge is often a hurricane's mostdestructive threat.
North Florida
Officials in Leon County, home to the state capital Tallahassee, are taking Irma seriously, imposing curfews beginning this evening. Irma should be a tropical storm or a Category 1 hurricane when it reaches the area.
Irma's forceful winds produced an interesting phenomenon around the state, pulling water away from shore. Animal control officials in south Florida may bring felony charges against the owners of dozens of dogs abandoned as Irma approached. On the bright side, a woman was able to deliver her own baby during Irma and this open 7-Eleven served as beacon of hope.

Very Blowsey....

Satellite TV has been in and out.....some electricity flickers but we haven't lost power yet.  Just had cheeseburgers and banana splits so we're not suffering too much.  Going to be an interesting night!  Instead of stockings hung with care in front of the fireplace it's some of the plants we've taken in from the Florida room...and outside yard.


And so it begins...

Lost the Satellite TV about an hour ago...Doesn't take much weather to knock that out though....thank God for Netflex etc!.  It is blowing pretty good....tornado warnings out for the entire county.  Was watching Titanic earlier....quit when they hit the iceberg.  Too hard to watch someone else going down by the head (.

Relaxing "Waiting for Irma" old time music...

Someone To Watch Over Me
https://archive.org/details/bwcb-2004-05-24/bwcb-2004-05-24_3.mp3#

Sunday morning overview for our Brevard County...

It's all fluid, but this is Florida Today's best guess as of early Sunday morning:

Late Sunday morning: Brevard will begin to experience tropical storm-force winds through the early afternoon as the Irma makes its way up the middle of the state and its outer bands begin to lap at the county.                   
Late Sunday afternoon: Brevard will begin to experience sustained tropical storm-force winds across the county. 
Sunday evening: From the afternoon to evening, hurricane-force bands will begin to creep into the county, with parts of southern Brevard experiencing sustained hurricane winds. 
Overnight Monday: After midnight Monday is when the brunt of the hurricane-force winds will come into the area. By 2 a.m. Monday, the county should be experiencing sustained hurricane-force winds. 
Palm Bay: The Palm Bay police and fire departments will suspend emergency services once sustained winds reach 50 mph, Keely Leggett, city spokeswoman, announced Saturday morning. Once sustained winds drop below that threshold, Leggett said normal emergency response services will resume. This policy will be enacted to ensure the safety of police officers and firefighters.

Saturday, September 09, 2017

Link to IRMA photo's, Saturday Sept 9th...Florida Today

http://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/2017/09/09/hurricane-irma-where-category-4-storm-now-and-where-headed/649182001/

All is calm....just rain, and that's a good thing! But it's early....

Went out to Christmas to get some paper products out of the rig and do a quick filming....back home to find Louis the Ringneck really enjoying his bath on the almost empty porch...



Looking like Hurricane Central....Saturday Sept 9th....




0700 Saturday....long night!

Alice is up watching MSNBC looking to see if there is any change in the storm track. Overnight it appears to have shifted to the West, so it looks like the West Coast will take the biggest hit.  But, the damn thing is so big it really doesn't matter I think...it's going up the entire peninsular. Alice just told me we're out of the "cone" so we might just get a bit lucky?

On a somber note, and this is something I hadn't even thought about (my bad) until I read it, here's an article from NPR that talks about what its like to be poor and dead in the path of the storm.  We had to look for our supplies to get well stocked up, and when the cash got low we went to the ATM and got more....some folks have NO options.  Very sad. http://www.npr.org/2017/09/08/549295524/poor-in-miami-hoping-to-ride-out-irma-on-bread-and-cans-of-tuna

0430 Saturday

Sleep is difficult.  Today is "get it in the house" day....deck stuff, plant stuff ....anything that can fly away or become a missile.

Friday, September 08, 2017

Filler on Irma...

http://flip.it/ZGx.nR

http://flip.it/N_jam3

Irma post from our friend Nina...

Pretty much sums up Florida weather.
Not my words, but exactly what is going on between folks in Florida and loved ones that live elsewhere.
Dear everyone who doesn't live in Florida but loves someone who does, here are some things you need to know about hurricanes:
They don't come until they come, so if you ask us how we are on a 93-degree sunshiny day 72 hours before we expect the winds to start, don't be surprised if we tell you we're fine. Please believe us. We're actively preparing, and we're watching the forecast more closely than you are, but we're truly fine at the moment.
Hurricanes are unpredictable. No matter how good the models are, hurricanes often demonstrate a mind of their own. We're always hoping and praying for a turn or "wobble" that sends the monster further from civilization. But if you ask us what's going to happen three or four days from now, we honestly don't know for sure (and neither do the meteorologists).
An entire state can't evacuate. Everyone packing up, jumping into their cars and heading north may seem like a great idea. However, the truth is that those of us in "safer" inland regions generally need to stay put to reserve the roads, gas, hotel rooms, shelters, plane tickets, etc. for the most vulnerable folks who live on the coast in the storm's path (where evacuation orders exist). Some inland folks may choose to leave, but most of us stay put and follow the instructions of our local governments.
We truly appreciate your love and concern, the offers to stay in your homes, and most of all your prayers. Just know that the media is doing a pretty good job of stirring up your anxiety...and ours. Of course we're worried, but we're trying to do all the right things to prepare and not freak out. Thanks for offering words of love and encouragement (and not jumping on the freak-out wagon - it just makes it harder on us).
Praying for Irma to make a hard right turn before Miami,
Your Florida loved ones 

Thoughts about Hurricane Irma, Friday Sept 8th, 2017




The hardest part seems to be the waiting....knowing it's on the way, that's she's aiming dead down the middle of the State but not knowing what the intensity will be when it gets here....hoping for the best, knowing it could be the worst.  Watching Weather Channel constantly would have the average person shopping for razor blades.  The Governor on downs job is to scare the bejesus out of everyone so that the folks in the evacuation zones do just that.

So we've done all that we feel we can to prepare.  Our motor home is fueled up and parked in Christmas Florida. Hopefully if this Town House gets it bad the rig (ten miles West of us) will have gotten through. It has of course a generator, refrigeration etc and would be a good place to live if this one isn't....a hell of a lot better then going to a shelter.  But, looking ahead there is NO way of knowing what is going to be affected so you don't know, until it happens, exactly what the problems are.  We have water (drinking and cooking), propane for our small stove, a fair amount of canned goods and stuff in the freezer that can be used up if it hits the fan.

This morning its life as usual. Alice is going to get her nails done, I'm going to water the plants and start bring in outside ornaments that could fly around. Tomorrow morning Joanna is going to help me start bringing in stuff from the upper deck, and then the plants will come in and most of the stuff from the Florida room. This is not our first rodeo, but it looks to be one of the worst that could happen.

What keeps me some-what relaxed is that this development of 88 town homes has never, since it was built 45 years ago, ever suffered any major structural damages to any of the units through all the storms. There have been shingles torn off and some siding, trees dropped etc, but nothing horrible.  I would not want to be South in Ford Lauderdale or worst yet, Miami or Hollywood. These places get torn up it seems on a very regular basis.  Since we moved here to Titusville from CT we've actually ghad very temperate weather.
Update 12:00pm, Sept 8:   Well, we went to the Motor Home in Christmas...closed all the vents and did a quick check on her...all ok.  Then, we had the thought of getting a few sandbags for the front door. The Town has plenty of sand but ran out of bags, and both Ace hardware stores are also out. So much for being a day late and a dollar short!  So, went into Publix and picked a few last minute food provisions...more water, some hot dogs and snacks.

Update, 1pm Sept 8th: Hurricane Irma continued its Category 4 crawl through the Caribbean Friday, with warning cones from the National Hurricane Center showing it overtaking Florida by Sunday evening. 
While Irma's exact strength and trajectory could still fluctuate, the 150-mph windspeed storm is guaranteed to make an impact on Brevard County by late Sunday and early Monday.
As of Friday morning, Irma was just under 565 miles away, moving northwest toward Florida at 14 mph. 
So what can Brevard residents expect — and when? Meteorologists with the National Weather Service, Melbourne, can't say with certainty exactly how strong the storm will be in a given area at a given time, but a general overview is possible. 
More: Brevard Zoo staff prepares animals for Hurricane Irma

Late Sunday morning: Brevard will begin to experience tropical storm-force winds through the early afternoon as the Irma makes its way up the middle of the state and its outer bands begin to lap at the county.                   

Late Sunday afternoon: Brevard will begin to experience sustained tropical storm-force winds across the county. 
Sunday evening: From the afternoon to evening, hurricane-force bands will begin to creep into the county, with parts of southern Brevard experiencing sustained hurricane winds. 
Overnight Monday: After midnight Monday is when the brunt of the hurricane-force winds will come into the area. By 2 a.m. Monday, the county should be experiencing sustained hurricane-force winds. 




Irma is nearly 400 miles wide, and meteorologists say hurricane-force winds can extend up to 70 miles from the eye, with tropical storm-force winds extending 185 miles from the eye. 
The NWS did not mince words in its Friday morning statement about Irma's impact on the area: 
"It is now very likely that this major hurricane will have significant and potentially life-threatening impacts to the citizens of east central Florida!! Extreme winds are of life-threatening concern and will have the potential for devastating to catastrophic impacts along Irma`s track." 
Structural damage to buildings, heavy flooding from storm surges and rain and tornadoes are all possibilities due to Irma, according to the NWS.